I thought I was the only one who found weird reasons to love afro-textured hair.

Is there really such thing as water resistant afro-textured hair???!!!

I guess I’ll make my own list. Feel free to add, anyone.

  • It’s gravity defying
  • Its helix shape resembles the DNA and proteins that make it up
  • It’s water absorbent (keeps me cool in the summer)
  • Keeps my head warm in the winter
  • Protective cushion against blunt forces or to lay down upon
  • So easy to twist into nice locs
  • It goes back to Prehistory
  • Versatility (the things you can do is only limited by your imagination)
  • It’s regarded as sacred in many cultures
yarrahs-life

yarrahs-life:

Woman Tells Steve Harvey Her Husband Almost Left Her After Seeing Her Kinky Natural Hair

For one thing, her hair was so beautiful the way she had it.

And the “She can’t do much with her hair” excuse, I bet he wasn’t saying that when she just wore straight hair day in and day out.

Why must she find other styles to her hair look less natural/less unappealing.

I’m calling bs on all his excuses.

Maybe he would have been more use to natural hair if he wasn’t getting those weekly haircuts.

And I have to give it to Love for her strength to bear with his ignorance.

Perhaps that is just me. Would anybody else would like to add?

afro-textured-art

afro-textured-art:

Lost Kingdoms

Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century

April 14–July 27, 2014

This is the first international loan exhibition to explore the sculptural art produced in the earliest kingdoms of Southeast Asia. From the first millennium onward, powerful kingdoms emerged in the region, embracing much of Indic culture to give political and religious expression to their identities. Early Hinduism (Brahmanism) and Buddhism arrived early, first witnessed by Sanskrit inscriptions, and shortly thereafter by a proliferation of large-scale religious imagery.

Comments: I’m sure there will plenty of images of the the Buddha with curly hair.

Buddha Offering Protection
Period: Pre-Angkor period
Date: second half of the 6th century
Culture: Southern Cambodia
Medium: Sandstone with traces of lacquer and gilding

This sculpture is a masterful realization of Buddhist dharma. It must have graced one of the major monasteries of Angkor Borei, a leading urban center of Funan. The Buddha is seated in yogic meditation, one leg resting on the other. The highly developed musculature follows Indian Kusana and early Gupta traditions in which the Buddha is celebrated as hero (vira) or great man (mahapurusha). It is arguably the earliest demonstration of this Buddha figure type in mainland Southeast Asia. The imposing scale and robust physique point to an early date.

Buddha Offering Protection

Period: Pre-Angkor period

Date: second half of the 6th century

Culture: Southern Cambodia

Medium: Sandstone with traces of lacquer and gilding

This sculpture is a masterful realization of Buddhist dharma. It must have graced one of the major monasteries of Angkor Borei, a leading urban center of Funan. The Buddha is seated in yogic meditation, one leg resting on the other. The highly developed musculature follows Indian Kusana and early Gupta traditions in which the Buddha is celebrated as hero (vira) or great man (mahapurusha). It is arguably the earliest demonstration of this Buddha figure type in mainland Southeast Asia. The imposing scale and robust physique point to an early date.

Head of Buddha
Date: 5th–6th century
Culture: Southern Vietnam
Medium: Sandstone

This head of the Buddha signals the processes of reception and acculturation of Indian styles of religious imagery into Southeast Asia. It may be assigned to the earliest known period of Buddhist art production in the Funan territories. The styling follows southern India models, specifically the Amaravati-style of Andhra Pradesh. The pronounced hair curls and the subtle modulation of the upper eyelid follow Indian conventions, evoking introspection and detachment, as does the sweet countenance.

Head of Buddha

Date: 5th–6th century

Culture: Southern Vietnam

Medium: Sandstone

This head of the Buddha signals the processes of reception and acculturation of Indian styles of religious imagery into Southeast Asia. It may be assigned to the earliest known period of Buddhist art production in the Funan territories. The styling follows southern India models, specifically the Amaravati-style of Andhra Pradesh. The pronounced hair curls and the subtle modulation of the upper eyelid follow Indian conventions, evoking introspection and detachment, as does the sweet countenance.

Head of Buddha

Date: late 5th–early 6th century

Culture: Southern Cambodia

Medium: Sandstone

This elegant head fits well into a small group of works from southern Cambodia. The proportions and the restrained modeling point to Buddhist art of the late Amaravati school of Andhra Pradesh as their genesis. The treatment of the hair curls, low wisdom topknot (usnisa), and forehead mark (urna) are in keeping with the Amaravati practice of depicting the auspicious marks of Buddhahood (laksana).

Lost Kingdoms

Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century

April 14–July 27, 2014

This is the first international loan exhibition to explore the sculptural art produced in the earliest kingdoms of Southeast Asia. From the first millennium onward, powerful kingdoms emerged in the region, embracing much of Indic culture to give political and religious expression to their identities. Early Hinduism (Brahmanism) and Buddhism arrived early, first witnessed by Sanskrit inscriptions, and shortly thereafter by a proliferation of large-scale religious imagery.

Comments: I’m sure there will plenty of images of the the Buddha with curly hair.

afro-textured-art
afro-textured-art:

Title: Statue. Fountain figure in the form of a nude, Nubian acrobat balancing on his chest and arms with his legs in the air; legs broken at knees.
Work Type:  Isolated Ronde-Bosse / Stone - Full-Length Statue
Period: ROMAN (after a Hellenistic original).
Description: Provenance: Rome, Villa Patrizi. 
Photo Source: Flickr,
Photographer: Rien_Photo,
Repository: ROMA., Museo Nazionale Romano. 

afro-textured-art:

Title: Statue. Fountain figure in the form of a nude, Nubian acrobat balancing on his chest and arms with his legs in the air; legs broken at knees.

Work Type:  Isolated Ronde-Bosse / Stone - Full-Length Statue

Period: ROMAN (after a Hellenistic original).

Description: Provenance: Rome, Villa Patrizi. 

Photo Source: Flickr,

Photographer: Rien_Photo,

Repository: ROMA., Museo Nazionale Romano.