medievalpoc:

Nicholas de Larmessin I
Portrait of Emperor Yohannes
French (c. 1680s)
216 x 121 mm
Engraving; Print on paper
Portrait of an Ethiopian Emperor: Black man bust-length, turned to the right, wearing crown, pearl necklace and embroidered cape, and holding sceptre in right hand; in oval frame with ribbon tied in the upper part, and coat of arms in the lower part.
"Emperor Yohann" is probably Prester John.
[x] [x]

medievalpoc:

Nicholas de Larmessin I

Portrait of Emperor Yohannes

French (c. 1680s)

216 x 121 mm

Engraving; Print on paper

Portrait of an Ethiopian Emperor: Black man bust-length, turned to the right, wearing crown, pearl necklace and embroidered cape, and holding sceptre in right hand; in oval frame with ribbon tied in the upper part, and coat of arms in the lower part.

"Emperor Yohann" is probably Prester John.

[x] [x]

Reblogged from afro-textured-art

Okay, so, about two weeks ago I contacted Egyptologist, Dr. Sally-Ann Ashston and told her about Afros and Curls in Art History. You may be familiar with her work on the Origins of the Afro Comb project and the recent exhibit of the same name that was in the Fitzwilliam Museum. Dr. Ashton also works on changing public perception on the  people of Kemet, so people would see them within an African context. Here is her Academia.edu page.

From our conversation, she promised to mail some of her publications related to the her exhibit. And lo and behold, they finally came!!!

afro-textured-art:

Archangel Raphael and the Miracle of the Sea Monster
mid 19th century, Ethiopia

The archangel Raphael is depicted standing above a church built in his honor. The painting illustrates the dramatic highpoint in a story that explains Raphael’s relationship to the church. According to legend, soon after the church’s completion, the ground beneath the building began to shake, and it became evident that the structure was built on the back of a sea monster. Raphael speared the monster, saving the church and its congregation from destruction. Raphael’s spear is shown descending down through the building; it is likely that the missing portion of the canvas featured the sea monster.

Photo courtesy and located at the Walters Art Museum, Birmingham

afro-textured-art:

Archangel Raphael and the Miracle of the Sea Monster

mid 19th century, Ethiopia

The archangel Raphael is depicted standing above a church built in his honor. The painting illustrates the dramatic highpoint in a story that explains Raphael’s relationship to the church. According to legend, soon after the church’s completion, the ground beneath the building began to shake, and it became evident that the structure was built on the back of a sea monster. Raphael speared the monster, saving the church and its congregation from destruction. Raphael’s spear is shown descending down through the building; it is likely that the missing portion of the canvas featured the sea monster.

Photo courtesy and located at the Walters Art Museum, Birmingham

Reblogged from afro-textured-art

afro-textured-art:

Archangel Michael and the Crossing of the Red Sea
mid 19th century, Ethiopia

Together with its companion on the opposite pillar, this work originally flanked the entrance to the “mäqdäs,” or sanctuary, of an Ethiopian church, where it served as a guardian figure. Here, the archangel Michael acts a protector of the Jewish people. The Old Testament scene beneath him is divided into three parts. On the left, the Red Sea consumes Pharaoh and his army, while, on the right, Moses closes the waters with his staff. Below, Aaron’s sister Miriam and another woman sing songs of praise. This object is one of only a handful of such monumental wall paintings that can be seen outside of Ethiopia.

Photo courtesy and located at the Walters Art Museum, Birmingham

afro-textured-art:

Archangel Michael and the Crossing of the Red Sea

mid 19th century, Ethiopia

Together with its companion on the opposite pillar, this work originally flanked the entrance to the “mäqdäs,” or sanctuary, of an Ethiopian church, where it served as a guardian figure. Here, the archangel Michael acts a protector of the Jewish people. The Old Testament scene beneath him is divided into three parts. On the left, the Red Sea consumes Pharaoh and his army, while, on the right, Moses closes the waters with his staff. Below, Aaron’s sister Miriam and another woman sing songs of praise. This object is one of only a handful of such monumental wall paintings that can be seen outside of Ethiopia.

Photo courtesy and located at the Walters Art Museum, Birmingham

Reblogged from afro-textured-art

The links:

I think people fascination with the Buddha’s hair might have to do other people insinuating an African influence. 

For example, that random blogger’s open distaste of the idea that Buddha’s hair could be influenced by African hair, prompted him to do his own research. 

And that what I think makes my article stick out, is that when African Americans on the internet noticed that the Buddha’s hair (in certain styles) look like theirs, I take it seriously other than dismiss them as “Afrocentric”.

Personally, I wish more people would talk about the origins of the tight curls and it similarities to afro-textured hair. As the Jstor acticle suggested, the tight curls also appears on Jina heads. 

begin rant/ 

Oh, and about dealing with people who don’t understand the difference between analyzing artistic styles and claiming a figure’s race (*cough* amicuzzo *cough*), I really don’t know how to deal with people like that.

That person tried to give me a hard time but didn’t even read my article. And when I told that person that I wasn’t arguing that Buddha was black they still kept coming at me saying I had an agenda. Like what? Maybe they might read it this time.

/end rant