afro-textured-art
medievalpoc:

Jean-Antoine Houdon
Portrait Bust
France (1781)
Plaster study for a fountain, 32 cm.
Soisson, Museé Municipal.
(Head of a black woman, her lips parted, looking slightly to the right.) The bust was damaged in World War I, leaving only the head intact.
The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

medievalpoc:

Jean-Antoine Houdon

Portrait Bust

France (1781)

Plaster study for a fountain, 32 cm.

Soisson, Museé Municipal.

(Head of a black woman, her lips parted, looking slightly to the right.) The bust was damaged in World War I, leaving only the head intact.

The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

Gondar Homiliary

This Homiliary was created in Gondar, Ethiopia, during a period of artistic flowering in the late seventeenth century. The text, a Homiliary focused on the Miracles of the Archangel Michael, combines liturgical readings with forty-nine brightly colored renderings of God, St. Michael, and the miracles related in the text. The artists were likely trained as painters, rather than solely as manuscript illuminators, and their art can therefore be linked stylistically to contemporary mural painting.

Creator: Zämänfäs Qeddus (Scribe)

Late 17th century (early Gondarine)

(Each image have an individual caption, click on them to read. The images are not in any particular order)

lovebuttandstuff

Warning: [Racism/Fetishization] This post is not safe for work or children

lovebuttandstuff:

afro-textured-art:

Statuette of a Male Deity

Place Made: Egypt

Dates: ca. 2675-2625 B.C.E.

Dynasty: III Dynasty

Period: Old Kingdom

Dimensions: 8 3/8 x 3 5/8 in. (21.3 x 9.2 cm) 

The figure’s large wig and unusual clothing, which consists of a penis sheath attached to a belt, indicate that he is a deity, but his exact identity is uncertain. Made for either a temple or a king’s tomb, this statue was the product of a royal workshop, where very hard stone such as gneiss was finely and carefully modeled. This depiction of the god’s strong, youthful body reflects the ideal of the male form in early Old Kingdom sculpture.

Comments: The helmet shape of the hairstyle brings to mind of a theory that prior to the introduction of the helmet, ancient Egyptians would use stylized wigs as protection. (Flecther p. 3 par. 4)

☆extra comments☆ It also shows that black guys had huge schools 4000 years ago too

#African penis size #size matters #huge penis tribe #bbc #dats racist #black penis #africa #big schlong

Notes: I assuming from the tags that this man meant “schlongs” instead of “schools”. Also, Lovebuttandstuff is a white male.

Rant: One of the things I detest is the fetishization of black people, especially in this situation black males. I just despise people who just see black males as sexual accessories to their “animalistic, big penis” fantasies. I especially hate the term “bbc”. And looking back at the tags this man does have some idea that these ideas are racist but probably just sees them as a joke. There’s not one tag there that doesn’t piss me off. I did see some people commenting on the size of the penis, which I did not mind. But I found it intolerable the moment someone ties in racist ideologies. End Rant.

The material I post is to be appreciated NOT fetishized, especially not from racists. 

I message the man to delete the comments and tags but has not gotten back to me. By the fact that continue to make post I am assuming he is ignoring my message. Not only that, looking back at his blog I noticed Lovebuttandstuff is actually a digusting human being who actually perpetuates the fetishization of black males. He has many posts that is tagged with racist nonsense such as these:image

image

image

the “3-U myth” – the myth that black hair is ugly, unmanageable and undesirable; the truth that black hair is underestimated, undervalued, and unloved; and, the goal to have black hair recognized as unique, urbane, and utopian.

"Black Women and Identity: What’s hair got to do with it?" by Cheryl Thompson

This quote is credited to Patricia Gaines, founder of Nappturality.com

pplofcolor

sancophaleague:

Now I’m not telling you to tell your son to go out with his hair matted to the side of his head or dirty, and not all black people do this but too often I hear black people tell young black boys that they got to “cut that nappy shit” or “aint no way we’re going to let you grow your hair”. They’re shamed for letting their hair grow and their parents are uncomfortable with it. It just goes along with Black people and our negative views about our own hair.

I work in the education system and I notice that young White, Asian, and Latin boys are allowed to rock a variety of short-mid length hairstyles. They are not just limited to the “low cut”. It seems that when Black boys try to do it they not only get made fun of as it being “nappy, ugly, peazy” but it’s reinforced by their parents.

We as a people think that when our hair grows out of our head it is unpresentable and we pass it down to our children. The only way a Black boy is presentable is when his hair is “clean-cut”. It’s a mindset that needs to change. We have to promote our own images.
Post Made by @Solar_innerg

‪#‎sancophaleague‬

I was the black boy who relished in feeling the texture of my hair when my parents forgot to take me to the barbershop for a few weeks.

Later at the age of 17 my mother let me grow out my hair. However I would always get comments by people saying I should cut my hair, way before it was even an inch from my head. Meanwhile guys with straight hair would always get the pass. 

Anyways, like always, our hair is a thing of unappreciated beauty. Let’s appreciate it NOW!

piccolowasablackman

piccolowasablackman:

afro-textured-art:

thecraftynubian:

afro-textured-art:

Afro-textured Hair in Western Art

Showcases the textured hair of people of mostly African descent represented in art created by European artists. 

Here, there’s more of a focus of the natural state of textured hair with minimal manipulation, usually getting only as complicated as twists.

All related content is tagged as “West

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Amazing!

Thank you!

this tumblr makes me so happy n my love of art history yesssss -celebrates-

-Celebrates in the name of natural hair and art history-

talesofthestarshipregeneration
talesofthestarshipregeneration:

afro-textured-art:

afro-textured-art:

An Egyptian Dancer
Painted limestoneNew Kingdom, Dynasty XIX (1292-1186 BC)Origin unknown, perhaps Deir el-Medina, later Drovetti Collection, 1824
Courtesy and currently located at the Museo Egizio. 

I really appreciate how the artist represented the long curls of hair to look so natural. Even in two-dimension it is possible to see that the artist was trying to represent corkscrew curls, type 3C-like appearance (type 3 hair, NaturallyCurly.com). I think it’s quite interesting how that type existed for so long.

Why is that so surprising tho?

Not surprised. Just fascinated.

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

afro-textured-art:

afro-textured-art:

An Egyptian Dancer

Painted limestone
New Kingdom, Dynasty XIX (1292-1186 BC)
Origin unknown, perhaps Deir el-Medina, later Drovetti Collection, 1824

Courtesy and currently located at the Museo Egizio.

I really appreciate how the artist represented the long curls of hair to look so natural. Even in two-dimension it is possible to see that the artist was trying to represent corkscrew curls, type 3C-like appearance (type 3 hair, NaturallyCurly.com). I think it’s quite interesting how that type existed for so long.

Why is that so surprising tho?

Not surprised. Just fascinated.

thecraftynubian

thecraftynubian:

afro-textured-art:

Afro-textured Hair in Western Art

Showcases the textured hair of people of mostly African descent represented in art created by European artists. 

Here, there’s more of a focus of the natural state of textured hair with minimal manipulation, usually getting only as complicated as twists.

All related content is tagged as “West

Follow.

Ask.

Submit.

Amazing!

Thank you!